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thoughts on the city's economic development? are we on the right track? what would you like to change about the city's approach to developing economies? >> in the chair of the land use committee this year, and i was vice chair last year with our former chair from the bayview hunters point area. i guess i approach land use and economic development from a different perspective. i'm not against development, but i want it to be equitable so we look at the lowest income populations or even middle income populations so that residents have a strong say as development moves forward, whether it is the park ridge said development in the southern, western part of the city or even treasure island with there's many low-income families that currently live there. but it is a strong voice for the residents that currently are there. we also want to see new people moving into the city, and hopefully, we focus also on families and housing that provides better homes and home opportunities for families, but i always say that i support equitable development. i also do feel that big business and downtown interest
. it is about 9.6% right now, and the fact that we have not done much about that in city hall i think is about to change. that is certainly something i will be focused on, putting people back to work. it is an individual issue, but it is a family issue, and we have a lot of families still struggling, and a think people have lost sight of that. hopefully, we will be getting out of this recession soon, but we need to do a lot in city hall to accelerate getting out of the recession, making sure families are back at work, making sure children are provided for. that is my biggest priority. >> talk about the issues facing your district specifically and how you are going to balance the issues facing the city at large against those in your district. >> we definitely have a few big projects for issues -- or issues we're paying a lot of attention to and we will continue to devote a lot of attention to, both myself and my staff. one of biggest ones is the planned development of the new campus for california and pacific medical center. that has dominated a lot of city-wide dialogue in the past few years.
right things to continue our success in the city. part of that success, is to work with great corporate citizens like unico and their efforts to make sure that they give their best effort to hire san franciscoans. today we celebrate not just a flag ship store but a store that has made corporate responsibility at the helm of their friend. there is over 500 people that they have already hired in this store. that is a fabulous contribution. they have worked that magic with our office of economic development, having spent weeks to train people who may not have gotten this opportunity. but for their out reach in this store, and then, they created a buzz and excitement in our city. i know that people will not only appreciate the fabulous fashions here, that you just look at these prices, for the kind of quality that they have. and i know that we have smart shoppers like supervisor kim who will be here in a minute and others who look for that casmere brand and also are very affected by the price sensitivity of the quality store. and then i want to just give a shout out. there are peo
. a great way to get out and play. >> for more information, across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our qualit
was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engineers found that development along the waterfront was causing pollution. so their search led them to the nearby schuylkill river. philadelphia developed technologies to pump water from the river into the city. these technologies established engineering concepts that
. poetic and ironic that we areç in san francisco city hall. the original building was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake and fires. two decades ago, it was completely rebuilt because of the loma prieçto earthquake. our fingers are crossed that there will not be any earthshaking today. our deputy administrator will talk about the shape specifically. i wanted to take a moment to thank our host, edwin lee, the mayor of san francisco. he has championed an equal focus on response and recovery. today he is our host in this majestic civil service building, probably the most majestic civil service building in the country. fema can take credit where credit is due. over the last several years we have been expanding especially in catastrophic planning with our partners from the greater bay area in catastrophic earthquake response plans we developed in 2008 and 2009 -- excuseç me, 2010. i wanted to set the stage about what we're here today to keep in the back of our minds. the type of event we're talking about could literally provide çdamages inñr theç scope ofç e kinds of implicati
back in a few minutes. we will send it down to sarah in notion city. >> -- ocean city. >> it it really is a beautiful evening, a lot of people are outside this evening. the water is relatively calm. the biggest concerns they have right now are flooding and beach erosion. they tell me there is an emergency plan in place. officials are watching the storm's track. they're expecting some flooding, so there are high water markers in place. otherwise, they're not many sandbags out. the city is relatively busy. officials are meeting regularly to evaluate the track. >> we are in the beginning stages of making sure that we have lists items put away. -- loose items put away. just trying to get ahead of things. we are in the prepared this mode, the information of mud. -- mode. >> the mayor is not expecting to see evacuation's this weekend. most of the visitors to ocean city will be leaving by late sunday, sunday afternoon anyway. as far as residents, at that point, they will most likely be asked to stay inside. >> it does not even look like an evacuation city for ocean city. the worst part of the
general manager at bart and has worked in other cities as well so his transit management experience is considerable, and i just wanted to note that. i will just add a couple of things. i think john hailey covered many of the points. the one management is overall topic how to keep service on time. switchbacks are a technique in line management. i think the real key issue at mta is actual transit operator staffing and when they have fewer than they need there are problems with filling runs and having to make other adjustments so i think keeping operator availability at a high level, highering and training on a regular schedule is critical to running muni effectively. just as antidote last night after the game i was downtown. there was a lot of joy and celebration, but there was also a lot of muni delay that was unanticipated, unanticipatable. i understand that trains were stranded on the embarcadero. that power had to be shut down for safety reasons. there were a lot of services that had to get rerouted. that happens. in a city like this and moves like muni does and the traff
behind the most of the people being evicted out of the city of san francisco in terms of the laws that they lay, what they're, the arrogance of their position. when you have the residents go before them because they are not being, they are not under the eye of observation. then you really see the bad side of why you need to bring this organization to the light where they could be observed. i think it's a good thing but by the same, we need it done like 25 years ago. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >> my name is [inaudible] ladies and gentlemen. the history goes back to 25 years ago to the housing authority and my statement i have been using at your commission for years, ain't no mystery, check your history. ladies and gentlemen, there's deeper history in what we're talking about with the city government channel. i'm the one that started that, i'm not going to get the hand for that because of same things the housing authority tenants went through 20 years ago. ladies and gentlemen, i am happy, tickled not pink by black right now because most of the tenants are a
north of cape may, atlantic city. but i just don't want you to focus on those cities. does it make that turn left in time? it didn't going left right now, and sometimes they wait. sometimes computers aren't perfe perfect, and why aren't they perfect? the atlantic ocean is a fast space, we don't have weather balloons out there. we have drop sons out of noaa weather radio. here it is, category 1, about an 80-mile-per-hour storm, right now as it makes landfall tomorrow night. and if there's any change to the forecast at all, i would say that's a little bit faster. the numbers bring in landfall the eye, but don't focus on 8:00, because a lot of the storm will be onshore, half of it will be onshore, even before the eye gets there, wherever it gets. you have to understand that things are going to start to go bad from here. this is how good it's going to get for the next 36 hours. no matter where with we are in here, this sides of it is so dangerous because the wins are coming in here. on up here into period of time. all the way here into tom's river and all of this has wind this way, the
charges filed by mayor ed lee. now what happens, and can everyone at city hall play nice? joedi hernandez spoke with the the sheriff one on one. it's been a long haul. does he think it's been worth it? >> reporter: it certainly has, and i believe he does think it was worth it. the reinstated sheriff returned to his offices here at city hall this afternoon. he says he is anxious to get back to work, and he says by his book he is officially the sheriff again. before he returned to his offices today, he took some time to share his thoughts and emotions with us on the roller coaster ride he's been through. >> we're tired. we didn't get much sleep last night to say the least. we're just absolutely gratified and thankful for all the aamazing support. >> reporter: though exhausted, the reinstated sheriff is all smiles. well-wishers stopped to congratulate him as he made his way back to work. >> it's time to heal, and it's not win or lose and what side or me being reinstated or not. i think it's time to heal, and it's nice that we all rise above, i think, this experience, which is agonizing for a
, could this storm shut down america's largest city. millions are told they could lose electricity for up to ten days. >>> the political storm. it's driving thousands to the polls for early voting and causing the campaigns to redo their plans for the all-important stretch run. >>> and tsunami warning. off the west coast. for hawaii. we'll have the latest. >>> hey, good morning. we're watching this developing storm with the hawaii tsunami warning. we'll start here, of course, with the superstorm, which one meteorologist has called part hurricane and part nor'easter. all trouble. look at sandy from space. it's expected to have tropical-force winds that extend out 500 miles from center. >> states of emergency have been declared up and down the east coast. a third of the country is expecting some combination of high wind, rain and snow. >>> take a look at this stastic. 261,000 homes, more than $80 billion in real estate could see storm surge damage if sandy hits shore. >> the big question this morning -- is when and where this megastorm hit land? sam champion has tracking the spot. from batte
the northeast. new jersey takes a direct hit. new york city especially hard hit. cabs floating down the street. subway tunnels floweded. a hospital evacuated overnight. tounds still under water in connecticut and long island and daylight is just beginning to reveal the full impact of it all, tuesday, october 30th. 2012. >>> from nbc news, this is a special edition of "today," tracking sandy, with matt lauer and savannah guthrie live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >>> and good morning. welcome to "today" on a tuesday morning. i'm savannah guthrie. >> and i'm matt lauer. the damage from sandy is widespread and extensive. while the worst of it seems to be behind us, the storm is still having an impact all up and down the northeast. this was a stuation of choose your poison. some people got hit with devastating wind, others drenching rains. the storm surge did so much damage in some places it was all three of those. >> and exceeded even what forecasters had predicted, a terrible storm. many people waking up in the dark this morning. sandy officially made landfall near atlantic city, new jers
overnight. unprecedented walls of water destroy the coastline and slam new york city. so much of the skyline plunged into darkness. a record-breaking loss of power. floodwaters pour into tunnels. hospitals forced to evacuate. >> oh, my goodness. it is an infant. >> now, new dangers. >> never being force to leave, not by water. not by flood, not by sandy, but by fire. >> nine states under a state of emergency right now. all the latest on the catastrophic damage, dramatic rescues and where the storm is headed next. our extreme weather team, live, in the storm zone. "good morning america's" special coverage starts, right now. >>> and good morning to all our viewers in the west. we're coming to you live right now. and lure yooking at the scene overnight in parts of new york city. the fires rage. entire neighborhoods burned up. over 50 homes destroyed. we've got new information pouring in every minute. this storm has been deadly. taken at least 17 lives so far. >> and there are so many scenes of devastation at this hour. from sandy, as we come on the air on the west coast, the damage is still unf
city. >> three people were injured overnight when flood waters made it difficult to get on the scene of a fire. >> we have live team coverage this morning, but we will begin with danielle leigh in cape may, new jersey. >> reporter: people are trying to get back to normal and laying out picnic tables and chairs. that said, the threat from hurricane sandy has passed. there is danger out there throughout most of the northeast. the communities are climbing out of a watery mess. sandy beat the eastern seaboard with a vengeance. >> we don't know if we have bodies out there. that is why we are on the road. >> reporter: streets that look like rivers and landmarks ripped apart have crews working over time today. >> i know people woke up to devastation. >> i was on the phone with fema at 2:00 a.m. to answer the questions they needed answered to get that designation. >> reporter: the atlantic boardwalk once packed with tourists is filled with debris and the roller coaster is surrounded by ocean. beach communities are digging out from the dunes that once protected them. >> it will be a while cle
of comes in the world of contrary opinion. you know, is an expression for the city to come to wall street will come to respect and understand and that is the stock market does whatever's got to do compound the largest group of investments. what never was complacent and comfortable the forecast for guys like me come in the market is something that surprises you. in the last five years have seen a significant tea risking by the public and by institutions of the equity ownership. so what would the pantry be? the market goes up because everybody is expecting the market to go down. so you look here and see a band, every year in the last five years comes to get selling of equity funds by the public. what are they doing? they buy bond funds. even though the market is up 14% to 15%, but continuing to liquidate. then you look at the pension fund set to appear pension funds go from 60% to near 50. most of actuary assumptions in the pension minus 7% or 8% a year. if either can be real estate private equity or equity is. and many lecture at the public. they've gone from 29% of financial assets in equ
and slam new york city. so much of the skyline plunged into darkness. a record-breaking loss of power. floodwaters pour into tunnels. hospitals forced to evacuate. >> oh, my goodness. it is an infant. >> now, new dangers. >> not by water, not by flood, not by sandy. but by fire. >> nine states under a state of emergency right now. all the latest on the catastrophic damage, dramatic rescues and where the storm is headed next. our extreme weather team, live, in the storm zone. "good morning america's" special coverage starts, right now. >>> and you are lookingt the scene overnight in parts of new york city. fires raging in the floodwaters. dozens of homes destroyed. entire neighborhoods on fire. we have new pieces of information pouring in every minute right now. this storm has taken many lives. at least 16 so far. there's so much devastation. >> it is remarkable, we're seeing these images more and more. and the 7.5 million people are out of power at this hour. the center of the storm, by the way, is over central pennsylvania. and we just got this in. a levee in new jersey was breached
weather team has the latest. >>> bracing for impact. could this storm shut down america's largest city? while power companies are calling in cavalry from out in the hartleyland, millions are told they could lose electricity for up to ten days. >>> the political storm. could sandy tilt the balance for the race to the white house? it's driving thousands to the polls for early voting and causing the campaigns to rejigger their plans for the all-important stretch run. >>> and tsunami warning. magnitude 7.7 earthquake off the west coast, triggers a tsunami warning for hawaii. we'll have the latest. >>> hey, good morning. we're watching this developing story in the hawaii tsunami warning. the threat not completely over. a live report in just a few minutes. >>> we'll start here, of course, with the superstorm, which one meteorologist has called part hurricane and part nor'easter. all trouble. take a look at sandy from space. it's expected to have tropical-force winds that extend out 500 miles om the center. >> states of emergency have been declared up and down the east coast. and it a states
now in new york city and long island because of the damage from former hurricane sandy. >> it's still amazing to see these images. sandy is now connected to the deaths of at least 17 people across the united states. an estimated 7.4 million homes and businesses are without power across 16 states and washington, d.c. in the hard hit big apple, the new york stock exchange, nasdaq and broadway theaters will be closed for a second straight day. we know now there's at least 10 to $20 billion in damage and 15,000 flights across the united states have been canceled. ines ferre is live in new york with more on the wrath of sandy. >>> reporter: hurricane sandy flooded some areas of new york city, knocked out power of thousands, and the southern part of manhattan is virtually shut down. >>> reporter: a storm surge nearly 14 feet high pushed ashore flooding hundreds of miles of coastline from virginia to massachusetts. >> it's the most flooding i have seen in all the years i have lived here. >> reporter: floodwater and high winds have knocked out power to millions of people. >> we are seeing a l
today, the navy will send three carrier ships to the shores of new york city. the ships and their crew will assist in rescue and recovery efforts. transportation in new york city is still struggling towards a return to normalcy. it's a slow return, though. standing water has grounded planes and kept subway cars from the tunnels. one sign of hope on the horizon, michael bloomberg ringing the stock exchange back into business after two empty days on the trading floor. we have reporters blankets both new jersey, new york and west virginia, which was hit hard by blizzard conditions. i want to begin live in atlantic city where the president, as we told you, is going to tour the area with the governor this afternoon. kayla. >> reporter: good morning, tom. it's that rare bipartisan meeting set to take place here in atlantic city, one of the eight new jersey regions declared a major disaster area by the president. as you can see the northernmost end of the boardwalk remains tattered from the storm. floodwater a lingering issue here. atlantic city remains a mandatory evacuation zone, and water
strengthening as we go through time. about 380 miles south of new york city it's movement has picked up northerly about 15 miles an hour and we still expect that turn toward the west later on. this is huge. reading some technical stuff, the tropical storm force winds, diameter nearly 800 miles wide. that is huge. the second largest tropical system we've seen in the last few decades. hurricane force winds extend 150 miles out. the amount of damaging winds is about 350 to 400 miles wide. so, that's wind of over 55 miles an hour. that is a huge swath of real estate that will be impacted by damaging winds when this thing makes its way onshore. here's the latest forecast track from the national hurricane center. hopefully our graphics are updated here. it hasn't changed a whole lot. the only thing that's changed is it may come on as slightly stronger hurricane or post-tropical storm strength hurricane meaning right now we're getting into the colder air. that temperature contrast and jet stream because of that temperature contrast will add more fuel to the fire here in the next 12 to 18 howar
from ocean city, maryland but right now let's take it to jeff flock in point pleasant beach new jersey. jeff? jeff: a little bit of ground zero for you, liz, at this hour south jersey really in the sights of this and for the worst of the storm. it's extraordinary in i have not covered a hurricane that has been -- the on set of which has been like this, which is just steady blowing, raining, coming at you, a sandblasting you, and no let-up. usually there's a let-up. usually there are fingers, there are ribbons of intensity that come in. this is just all blow coming straight at you. take a look at this sea foam on the beach, and i will tell you, we are not that far away from low tide. the key is going to be tonight when we get to high tide here because you see that surf behind me, the wind that has been pushing that surf begins to then cooperate with the tide at about 7:16 local time here in point pleasant beach new jersey and that begins to drive that water inland. that's what's going to do all the damage. not so much the wind. there's minor wind damage so far. it is going to be that wa
fire. it broke out at this home on linda florez street in the city's bariesta neighborhood. the fire did some heavy damage. family members said they heard an explosion and felt the house shake before they saw the fire. >> there was an explosion and the kids came running and said there was an explosion in my room. we opened the door and there was smoke everywhere. >> reporter: the cause of the fire is under investigation. a hazmat team has been called in to investigate. pg & e did an investigation. >>> that super storm continues to cause massive problems over mid-atlantic states. so far 7 million are without power. our health and science editor john fowler has been monitoring the storm and is here now with some remarkable pictures to show just how bad this storm is. >> look at this a levee breech in new jersey crews still looking for survivors. early this morning, three towns submerged. as many as 100 homes destroyed. winds topped 90-miles-an-hour in new york city a historic 13- foot storm surge flooded the city's subway system it could be four days before trains run again. 260 patie
closer to the biggest cities on the east coast. ktvu 2 morning news continues. >> announcer: complete bay area news coverage starts right now. this is ktvu 2 morning news. >> good morning. it's monday, october 29. i'm dave clark. >> good morning, i'm pam cook. thank you for joining us this morning. we're watching the weather here and out east because it's a monster -- >> it's unprecedented, historical. >>> for us, though, we have a little change in our weather pattern. now, because of the magnitude of sandy, everything is kind of slowing down so we're holding off until thursday morning but we have dense fog. that is until 8:00 but some of the fog until 9:00. here's sal. >>> stever, traffic on interstate 880 oakland good in both directions and more crowded, though, as you head to the bay bridge toll plaza. also we're looking at the toll plaza and more crowded with still room for fast track and carpoolers. let's go back to the deverick. >>> topping our news for the second time in three years, the san francisco giants are world champions. they swept the detroit tigers with a 4-3 victo
for this blockbuster party. >>reporter: take a look at this san francisco city hall of low in the color orange the lights have been switched out in honor of the san oroszko giants. the team's colors are seen here as they placed balloons on the san francisco-enjoy it's a major transformation. speaking at a news conference the mayor promised that is going to be a grand event and it certainly seems to be unfolding that way >> as you know this was such a team effort. we decided that we would get a city team to gather to have a great, great celebration. >> to announce these details there are going to be at least 20 trucks of colored confetti. thousands of balloons and players will be an open vehicles so they ca that is the change from 2010. >> a little different in 2010 when if you recall many of the players were put on the cable cars. a lot of the fans said they could not see them. they had to go from one side to the others of this time there are individual vehicles. >> other specifics. >> they will come up market street. and turn on mcallister and to make their way down towards the plaza. towards
the baltimore city police officers are on suspension after the death of a man in police custody. the medical examiner determined that anthony anderson died of blunt force trauma. his family is calling for murder charges against the police officers who arrested him shortly before he died. we are live a police headquarters with the latest. >> the autopsy concluded that anthony anderson died a violent death, suffering blunt force trauma including broken ribs and a ruptured spleen. his death was ruled a homicide which technically means death at the hands of another person. local activists and relatives of anthony anderson rallied to call for murder charges against three police officers who arrested him on the timber 21st. >> we are calling for murder charges. we are calling for these officers to be fired. an end to their paid vacation at the taxpayers' expense. >> anthony anderson and counted the officers on this make it lot. detectives assigned to the violent crime section reported they moved in to arrest him after they caught him in a drug deal. >> the observed with the expected -- suspected t
atlantic city, new jersey, casinos are boarded up and closed, part of the boardwalk has wash wad way. >> tourists and locals are preparing for flooding and power outages. in new york city waves are splashing over the sea walls. here's t.j. winick live. >> reporter: good afternoon whether here on the southern tip of new jersey or 150 miles north up in new york city, we are expect to see water rise from 6 to 11 feet. it could have a devastating impact on the east coast. forcasters predict this could be the worst storm in two generations. hurricane sandy is strengthening and heading north. with 50 million in its path. the eye is expect to make landfall late monday night in atlantic city, new jersey but will.i.am pack communites hundreds of miles away. >>> -- >> -- >> this is going to be a big storm, a difficult storm the great thing about america is we all pull together. >> reporter: the real fear is sandy's storm surge, fueled by high winds and a full moon. >> we are talking the ocean coming in causing massive flooding. >> reporter: already a spectacle early monday in cape may, the ang
cause catastrophic destruction, hurricane sandy picking up steam, moving toward the biggest cities on the east coast. >> a ripple effect for travelers in the bay area. we'll tell you about how many flights are cancelled leaving sfo into the east coast this morning. >>> good morning to you, welcome to a brand new day, monday october 29th. i'm dave clark. >> good morning i'm pam cook. thank you for joining us. steve called it a bomb of a weather system. >> this will be historic. >> okay. >> i mean, it is amazing how big this system is back there. it could get stronger, it is getting stronger. this will have a big impact maybe all the way to the election. what happens if people don't have power? this may be felt well into next week and beyond. >> we have a very, very thick fog pattern, a dense fog advisory is out. we'll have more on the giants' victory parade and halloween. >> traffic is now very feeling and this is the east shore picture we normally can see. you can see a couple cars through here because of the fog. this morning we're looking at the bay bridge toll plaza, it is light
have these live pictures here, atlantic city, these are tape pictures, but you can see, look at the water here. some cars moving. atlantic city. we've been looking into atlantic counties, specifically, something like five feet of water on some of these roads and, folks, it will get worse. right now we know of at least 116,000 homes without power. those numbers will obviously change. but i just want to hit home this point, that everything about sandy is huge. you see the system. this is on your screen here. the wind field, this is something we'll talk to chad about, the wind field roughly 900 miles wide, 60 million people all the way from north carolina to maine could be affected by this hurricane. about 61,000 national guard troops have been deployed. the president making the point that a lot of the resources, as best as they can, have been prepositioned in anticipation of this storm. $87 billion worth of homes reportedly at risk. and in manhattan, the new york stock exchange closed today and we know it will be closed tomorrow. also shut down, amtrak, subways in new york, was
of the month when traders prays their portfolios. meantime, new york city mayor is set to hold a news conference on sandy 45 minutes from now. we will go to that conference once the mayor begins his remarks. we'll hear from a number of ceos about how sandy has impacted their businesses. the heads of hartford financial and landry is among the top executives who will be joining us over the last few hours. how equity index futures are trading. will cease trading in 15 minutes time. the dow and nasdaq pointing d n down. as for europe, the action dominated by deutsche bank and bp. we do see green arrows across the board with a 1% gain in germany. >> at least 16 deaths blamed on sandy as the storm continues to wreak havoc on the northeast with new york and new jersey dechaired major disasters. overnight more than 200 patients have been evacuated from two nyu langone hospitals after backup power failed. millions on the east coast awoke without power or mass transit. an estimated 7.8 million are believed to be without power and experts say it could be several days before it is restored. mass
are right here in new york city. lower manhattan hit by a record storm surge of more than 13 feet. it has flooded streets and the ground zero construction site. just look at that dramatic photo taken there overnight. >> some subway station and tunnels or stations and tunnels are flooded as well. transit officials say the system, "has never faced a disaster as devastating as this." during the height of the storm, the island of manhattan seemed like it had been virtually cut off, with almost all of the major bridges and tunnels shut down. we've got it covered this morning. let's get the latest from natalie morales. she's in lower manhattan, battery park city. natalie, good morning. >> good morning to you, matt. it is a new day, and the worst of it may be over, but it is clear the aftermath of sandy, the devastation will be with us for a while. as you mentioned, main concern obviously is still flooding. president obama has declared new jersey and parts of new york major disaster areas. millions here are still without power up and along the eastern seaboard. we could be without power for up t
buildings and properties in the city which don't pay taxes but use our services and use our roads, put the stress or extra burden on property taxpayers. that is part of the burden they have to bear for being the capital city and some times what the state wants to do doesn't necessarily follow the typical ordnances most businesses and residents have to comply with. city ordinances don't necessarily apply to the state so it can be a fraction point but we try to work through those things and understand the benefits of being the capital city far away from the down side that we have to deal with but the biggest challenge is always jobs and that is true of any community. you have seen what we have to offer. it is a vibrant community and there's a lot going on and a brand-new hospital coming online and brand new courthouse that is a $15 million project and the commerce center down the road that is the major construction. we are going to have a big construction project on the interstate that will make traffic move better and commercial development going on in this city and in the census w
on the east coast. in new york city they are closing schools, even shutting down the subway system starting tonight. abc's randy hit is in kill level hills north carolina with the latest on hurricane sandy. >> normally i don't get that nervous, but not feeling that good about >> it will knock down trees and power lines. >> we should not underestimate the impact of this storm. >> sandy is expected to run right into a cold front and that will super charge it. >> this could set historical precedence if it develops along the lines that the american models are indicating. >> that kind of power could launch four to ten foot storm surges in vulnerable areas of washington d.c., new jersey and new york. >> if it would strengthen unexpectedly or change its path it could do a lot of damage and you could be at risk. >> that's why families all along the east coast are boarding up, stocking up on food and water, generators and batteries and other supplies. >> prepare for the worst and hope for the best. >> bracing when sandy strikes. >> sandy is already reeking flush havoc on travel. flights have been ca
from atlantic city. it's so difficult to get your mind wrapped around the potential for this storm, and we've been watching it for days and days and days. it's going to be an 80-mile-an-hour storm as it makes its way onshore. it won't move much for 48 hours. if it's raining, it will continue to rain. if it's snowing, it will continue to snow. if it's blowing, around it will everywhere, trees are going to continue to blow down. as the trees blow down, they're not going to be able to put line crews in the way 69 wind to put your lines back up. once your power is out, it's going to be out for a couple days no matter what. >> when it's done, it's done. chad, stick around. chad myers is going to help me out throughout the hour here. we're going to be here obviously until this is over. we may be on the air live here from this vantage point until midnight so chad myers, thank you very much. i want to tell our viewers, chad is not playing around. the officials who have come out not playing around with information. before we go to kill devil hills, i want to say the wires that are coming in
a critical time for new york city and the rest of the northeast as massive storm gets set to make landfall in the next two hours. the situation getting dangerous in many parts of the east coast. as you see in manhattan, there is a situation involving a damaged crane. in midtown. we will continue to update you on that and other developing stories over the course of the hour. by the way, we now know that emergency workers on the scene of that crane dangling off a 65-story building, that building is being built to a 90-story building. that's why the crane was on top of the building. they have now -- they're going as high as they can to inspect the crane. but city officials say there are no plans right now to take down the crane and remove the crane because it is simply too dangerous. governor cuomo will call into the show after that press conference, so we'll talk to him directly in terms of business on new york. first, let's get to courtney reagan, smehe's at the news des >> we're hearing from our partners at wnbc that the department of building engineers are going up in the building to insp
,000 flights across the country have been canceled. ines ferre has the latest in new york city. >> reporter: thousands of new yorkers today are without power and the southern part of manhattan is virtually shut down. >>> reporter: a storm surge nearly 14 feet high pushed ashore flooding hundreds of miles of coastline from virginia to massachusetts. >> it's the most flooding i have seen in all the years i have lived here. >> reporter: floodwater and high winds have knocked out power to millions of people. >> we are seeing a large number of fires caused by downed wires and electrical problems relating to outages. >> reporter: more than 200 firefighters are still battling a blaze in an evacuation in queens. more than 50 homes have already been destroyed. the cause of the fire is still being investigated. and power outages prompted a mass evacuation from nyu hospital when a backup generator failed. dozens of ambulances lined up to evacuate more than 200 patients throughout the early- morning hours and extra help was called in to help move patients. >> we have 50 firefighters coming here as well
seen in this city that never sleeps. sandy set a 13-foot high wall of water rushing through new york harbor and that water pouring into the subway tunnels. the head of the mta calling it the worst damage seen in the 100-year history of public transit here in the city. >> in a most dramatic fashion, sandy's winds caused a twisted crane to dangle perilously more than 70 floors up over midtown manhattan. look at that. emergency crews worried that it would slice through like a hot knife through butter. >> when i saw is the reports of the firefighters in queens or downtown manhattan i could see in my mind's eye not only the buildings and the planes, but the people. >> it's a lot to get you up to speed on and we are waiting for mayor michael boomberg to speak, and we do want to get the latest from the jersey shore which as we told you took the direct hit from sandy as that storm came ashore near atlantic city in the southern part of new jersey. nbc's ron allen has been reporting from new jersey and what are you seeing now that we have the light of day to see the damage. >> reporter: we're
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